Anthem by ayn rand contest essays

Technical Comments: Paragraph numbering has been added next to text of the novel. These are formatted with a chapter number followed by sequential numbers for each paragraph within that chapter. (The chapter "number" for the Author's Foreword is 'F.') Paragraphs with annotations are marked with a [*] next to the paragraph number. HTML links are available for each paragraph and for the notes. Authors wishing to reference or link to a specific paragraph simply need to format the URL as follows: "http:///orc/texts/anthem/#A " -- where "" represents the chapter and paragraph numbers. Links can be made to the headings of each chapter (the Roman numerals) in the same way, using '0' (zero) as the paragraph number. Links to the notes use the chapter and paragraph numbers, followed by a lowercase letter 'n' -- for example "" is the designation for the note related to chapter one, paragraph seven.

The walls are cracked and water runs upon them in thin threads without sound, black and glistening as blood. We stole the candle from the larder of the Home of the Street Sweepers. We shall be sentenced to ten years in the Palace of Corrective Detention if it be discovered. But this matters not. It matters only that the light is precious and we should not waste it to write when we need it for that work which is our crime. Nothing matters save the work, our secret, our evil, our precious work. Still, we must also write, for--may the Council have mercy upon us!--we wish to speak for once to no ears but our own.

So, contrary to Rand, capitalism doesn’t need greed. At the same time, it can channel greed, which is all to the good. We should want a social order that channels proper self-interest as well as selfishness into socially desirable outcomes. Any system that requires everyone always to act selflessly is doomed to failure because it’s utopian. That’s the problem with socialism: it doesn’t fit the human condition. It alienates people from their rightful self-interest and channels selfishness into socially destructive behavior such as stealing, hoarding, and getting the government to steal for you.

The reason for the books' success probably has less to do with their novelistic merits, or lack of them, than with the way they package in fictional form a philosophy Rand called Objectivism, which in effect turned the Judeo-Christian system on its head. In Rand's view, selfishness was good and altruism was evil, and the welfare of society was always subordinate to the self-interest of individuals, especially superior ones. In some ways, Objectivism is an extreme form of laissez-faire capitalism, a view that Rand came to naturally. She was born in Russia in 1905, lived through the Russian Revolution, and by the time she emigrated to America, in 1926, determined to reinvent herself, she wanted no part of anything that resembled a state-run system. She sometimes wore a gold brooch shaped like a dollar sign, and the dollar sign is also the final image in "Atlas Shrugged," a novel in which liberals and humanitarians are ruinously taking over the world while the intellectual elite, led by the genius industrialist John Galt, hunker down in Colorado. For a while in the '60s, Objectivism had almost cult status on some American campuses. Much of the fervor dwindled after Rand’s death in 1982, but the books continue to be rediscovered and passed from one initiate to another. Among the many people influenced by Rand are Camille Paglia, Hugh Hefner, Alan Greenspan and Angelina Jolie. -- Charles McGrath, Sept. 13, 2007.

  • Latest
  • Search Search Clear this text input
Latest Articles
  1. Common Sense As a Guru, Ayn Rand May Have Limits. Ask Travis Kalanick. For all the influence of the Objectivist principles set forth in “The Fountainhead” and other works, some prominent followers have run into trouble.

    Anthem by ayn rand contest essays

    anthem by ayn rand contest essays

    The reason for the books' success probably has less to do with their novelistic merits, or lack of them, than with the way they package in fictional form a philosophy Rand called Objectivism, which in effect turned the Judeo-Christian system on its head. In Rand's view, selfishness was good and altruism was evil, and the welfare of society was always subordinate to the self-interest of individuals, especially superior ones. In some ways, Objectivism is an extreme form of laissez-faire capitalism, a view that Rand came to naturally. She was born in Russia in 1905, lived through the Russian Revolution, and by the time she emigrated to America, in 1926, determined to reinvent herself, she wanted no part of anything that resembled a state-run system. She sometimes wore a gold brooch shaped like a dollar sign, and the dollar sign is also the final image in "Atlas Shrugged," a novel in which liberals and humanitarians are ruinously taking over the world while the intellectual elite, led by the genius industrialist John Galt, hunker down in Colorado. For a while in the '60s, Objectivism had almost cult status on some American campuses. Much of the fervor dwindled after Rand’s death in 1982, but the books continue to be rediscovered and passed from one initiate to another. Among the many people influenced by Rand are Camille Paglia, Hugh Hefner, Alan Greenspan and Angelina Jolie. -- Charles McGrath, Sept. 13, 2007.

    • Latest
    • Search Search Clear this text input
    Latest Articles
    1. Common Sense As a Guru, Ayn Rand May Have Limits. Ask Travis Kalanick. For all the influence of the Objectivist principles set forth in “The Fountainhead” and other works, some prominent followers have run into trouble.

      Media:

      anthem by ayn rand contest essaysanthem by ayn rand contest essaysanthem by ayn rand contest essaysanthem by ayn rand contest essays